10 Years, Red, Otherwise

The Chameleon Club Presents

10 Years

Red

Otherwise

Thu, October 19, 2017

6:00 pm

Chameleon Club

$20.50 - $23.00

This event is 18 and over

10 Years
10 Years
After a year and a half on the road touring 2010’s Feeding The Wolves, 10 Years reached a turning point. It was time to move forward and take full control of their career by launching their own label, Palehorse Records. In addition, the band decided to self-produce their fourth album, Minus the Machine, at drummer/guitarist Brian Vodinh’s Kashmir Recording.

Splitting up with a major label after
five years was “a very scary step to take,” Hasek admits. “It’s like breaking up with a longtime girlfriend. You’re used to the motions, but when it becomes stale and unhappy, you need to move on and get energy back into your life. There was no anger on either side. We just painlessly parted ways.”

Working together as a band for the first time since writing the Gold-selling album The Autumn Effect helped 10 Years go back to their roots, without label-enforced pressure to create a radio-friendly “hit,” and free to experiment with the hard rock sounds that lie at the core of their music. “Our true fans who buy the albums, not just the singles, understand that our singles, for the most part, misrepresent the entire album,” says Hasek. “As a band, we like to explore more and go a little left of center with song structures. We wanted to create an album that has no boundaries, and where we didn’t have to make every song ‘three minutes and 30 seconds’ for a label to approve it. There’s a fine line with that, of course, and we’re very aware of it. We all grew up on rock music, and as many albums as we’ve written, the way we’ve written them, it’s ingrained in us to work within a time frame that fits radio. There are definitely songs that work well for that, but as a whole, we wanted this album to represent a journey in a sense.”

This chapter of 10 Years began in 2001, when Hasek took over as vocalist. Three years later they released their independent album, Killing All That Holds You, featuring the groundbreaking single “Wasteland,” which led to their signing with Universal Records. “That song was created in 2001 or 2002,” says Hasek. “We weren’t seeking to write a smash single. We were just writing music.” The Autumn Effect (2005) led to widespread radio and video play, a fiercely loyal fan base, and tours with heavyweights like Linkin Park, Korn and the Deftones. When their sophomore effort, Division, was released in 2008, 10 Years had cemented their place as one of hard rock’s top contenders and most sought-after live bands. Still, says Hasek, despite the success, “it all came to a head” with the band’s 3rd major label release, Feeding The Wolves. “When you feel like you’re being told to go through motions and jump through hoops, it takes the heart out of it,” he says. “We know that we need a hit and we understand that it’s important. However, as musicians, we’re not a band that says, ‘We’re going to make a hit.’ It’s better to do what comes naturally and then figure out the after-effect.”

With that in mind, 10 Years created their most powerful songs to date for Minus The Machine, with Hasek again relying on personal experiences for his lyrics. [Insert something about the songs here; reference titles and content.] “Everyone asks about my inspiration for lyrics, and the best thing I can give them is a very generic answer: life,” he says. “Life is the experience — it’s everything you go through: the ups, the downs. I tend to gravitate more toward the therapy method. I’m not great at writing happy pop songs. So, I usually get the negative emotions out through music. As a person, I’m very happy and thankful for my life, but when it comes to lyrics, it’s therapy for me.”

One thing that won’t change is 10 Years’ connection with their fans. With the release of Minus The Machine, the band is looking forward to hitting the road, performing in close contact with their dedicated audience. “After the last touring cycle, we realized where we should strive to be, and that’s to be totally fine in the club environment,” says Hasek. “We don’t plan to chase after arena rock or amphitheaters. If things like that happen, then so be it, but we live and die by the loyalty of the club audiences. Our fans are loyal. They travel with us, and they want us to be loyal to ourselves. That’s what keeps them coming back. What we tried to do on this album is really give them what they want and what they need because they’ve been so good to us through the ups and downs of our career.”

“First and foremost, when it’s all said and done, we’re proud of this album in its entirety,” he says. “That speaks volumes to us because we’re our own worst critics. We pick everything apart. An album is your child, it’s your baby, and you know it better than anyone. To sit back and be 100 percent proud of what we’ve accomplished is so gratifying, and we think everything else will fall into place. We hope that everyone will enjoy what we’ve tried to do.”
Red
Red
Reaching. Yearning. Struggling. Wanting. Needing.

The epic quest of finding one’s identity might be one of the most universal themes found in the pursuit of art. The hopeless wandering replaced by the hope-filled breakthrough has been chronicled time and again in painting, sculpture, prose, poetry, film and, certainly, music.

The men who make up the rock band RED have been through those trials thems...elves. They’ve taken those experiences to heart, mixed them with a plethora of influences – be they observations on art they admire, or communications with fans they adore – and now burst forth with a dynamic new set of songs geared toward finding who we truly are, inside and out.

The time is now for Until We Have Faces.

“We had the title before anything else,” says RED bassist Randy Armstrong. “And we didn’t set out to make a concept record. But as I sat and listened back to the final record, it’s amazing how much of the content, pretty much unintentionally, deals directly with the title of the record. From start to finish, it’s about all the emotions people go through trying to find their identity.”

It takes some doing to meld divergent inspirational resources as author C.S. Lewis with the stylings of Sevendust and Slipknot. But that’s exactly what RED has done with Until We Have Faces – merge those ideas that inspire with experiences that inform, and craft face-meltingly driving tracks as the
end result.

From the out-of-the gate relentlessness of “Feed The Machine” and “Faceless” through the roller coaster of emotion of the song cycle of “Let It Burn,” “Buried Beneath” and “Not Alone,” to the hope and comfort (even in the midst of mourning) of “Best Is Yet To Come” and “Hymn For The Missing,” RED compels the listener to walk through the fire of confusion and pain to emerge confident and strong in their identities.

Simultaneously, the members of RED – Randy Armstrong, bass; Anthony Armstrong, guitar; Michael Barnes, lead vocals and Joe Rickard (named one of 2010’s up and coming drummers” by Modern Drummer magazine) on drums– have had to go through a season of rediscovering who they were as a band, with Rickard as the newest member, both a live force and contributor to the songwriting process for Until We Have Faces.

The result of that introspection is a cleaner, more focused RED in the live space, and an injection of new energy in the writing and recording situation, as Rickard made his presence felt with authority. Many of the tracks on Until We Have Faces were based on his drum parts, with the rest of the band and production team (with producer Rob Graves again at the helm) building from them; something quite rare in the rock realm, and certainly a working departure for RED.

“Joe was writing an entire song the way he would hear it as a drummer; structure, pre-chorus, chorus, turnaround, everything,” Anthony says. “And I told him, ‘If that’s how you write, that’s how I write. If you give me your drums, I’ll write over it.’”

“There’s a symmetry to everything now,” Randy elaborates. “We’ve kinda settled into this as four guys with a very serious focus. We get on stage, and it just feels different. It’s very clean and more intense. When we started out doing this, we were punk kids who just wanted to make noise,” he continues. “Now we’re really concentrated on being a great band.”

So while the ferocity of the musical attack has been amped up, so too the emotion and messages conveyed via the songs on Until We Have Faces. The job and passion of bringing those emotions to the surface falls to vocalist Barnes, a quiet and unassuming man offstage but an undeniable force on stage and in the vocal booth.

He knows the goal: connecting those hard-earned fans with the stories being told through RED’s music. “I like to think about our audience and what they’re going to feel the first time they hear the record,” Michael says. “What are some of the emotions that may impact them? I try to get that emotional feeling stirred up inside me.”

In the making of Until We Have Faces, Barnes was charged with quickly finding his place within these songs, as accelerated recording time frames meshed with playing packed shows didn’t give the band and its oft-screaming vocalist a lot of down time.

“We had so little time to get ready, because we were all doing 10 different things at a time,” Barnes says. “One of the things I did on this record was to try to push my voice to a whole other limit. It’s a lot raspier, a lot more impactful style of singing.”

“I just remember showing up at the studio, watching Michael track,” Randy says, “and on the last record, we did all the vocals first, and the screams dead last, because we knew if we did them at the same time, Rob wasn’t going to get out of Michael what he needed. “But I’d show up some nights, and Michael would be in the midst of recording the entire song, and I told Rob a number of times that Michael sounded really strong. His stamina is there.”

“There’s one song – ‘From The Outside’ – where the timbre of my voice makes it sound like I’m about to actually lose my voice,” Barnes continues. “I did ‘Watch You Crawl’ that night, and then I sang ‘From The Outside.’ We never would have done that in the past, but I think it really adds to the emotion of that song.”

“Part of me feels like this record would not have been captured the way it was if the timeline hadn’t been as tight as it was,” Anthony says. “I feel like the time pressures made us all step up to the plate like we never had; yet another way we had to find our identity through this project.”

Another crucial aspect of RED’s overall identity is the band’s relationship with its fans. Through feedback and support received with RED’s first two Grammy nominated projects, End of Silence (6/6/06) and Innocence & Instinct (2/10/09), and the five-plus years of near-constant touring, the members knew they could reach out to the fan base for inspiration and direction for Until We Have Faces.

“When we first started writing songs for this record, we put a post on Facebook asking what our fans wanted to hear songs about,” Randy says. “We got over 1,000 responses to that, and just to see what they wanted or were struggling with was incredible.”

It’s part of that ongoing and ever-changing process of trying to find out who you are, as the circumstances and definitions of the world morph around you. And it’s in that continuous examination that new answers can continue to be found, even for a band that’s been asked the origin of its name a million times.

“People ask what the name RED means and where we came up with it; it’s a power color, a very emotional thing,” Barnes says. “And I think our music gets to the core of that. We’re really trying to flesh out and draw out those emotions that may have been stagnant or just stirring up in people.”

The thing is, the members of RED really don’t mind the questions. And they’re inviting fans to help them find the answers. They know it’s in the reaching, the yearning, the struggling, the wanting and the needing that new identity is formed, emerging forged and strong, powerful and loud.

There’s little need to wait Until We Have Faces. For that time is now.
Otherwise
Otherwise
Las Vegas will always be the city of sin, but it means a lot more to OTHERWISE.
While the rest of us go there to let off steam, roll the dice and enjoy the eye candy, OTHERWISE grew up in the shadows of all the bright lights and broken dreams. Las Vegas is their home, and it's where they've lived life, faced death, and climbed the mountain of trials and tribulations that have become True Love Never Dies, their debut album for Century Media Records.
"We weren't as aggressive when my brother and I first started jamming, but then things started to happen – people died, relationships ended and life got more real," says OTHERWISE frontman Adrian Patrick. Despite being raised in a tight-knit family, Adrian only started playing music with his brother – guitarist Ryan Patrick – a few short years ago. "Our writing was a lot simpler when we started, but as circumstances forced us to grow up, our music matured with us. Tragedies and loss are part of life, and our music is one of the ways we maintain a positive outlook despite the setbacks."
Nowhere is that more evident than on the band's breakthrough single, "Soldiers." The song began as a metaphor for the battle that unsigned bands go through to get their message heard as artists, then quickly transformed into an anthem for everyone living on the front-lines of life. "When I started writing the lyrics, I was staring at my bandmates and thinking that they are my brothers in arms," says the singer. "It was going to be our anthem, but by the time I finished I realized it was an anthem for our whole nation. We are all soldiers fighting for something, whether it's to put food on the table, to be heard, or just to be happy. Every soldier is human, and we're all human."
Already hailed by Fox News as the No. 1 unsigned band in America, "Soldiers" became the song that brought the local Vegas rockers to the national spotlight. Hand-picked to perform alongside Avenged Sevenfold and Five Finger Death Punch on the mainstage of the inaugural 48 Hours Festival in October 2011, MTV Headbangers Ball host and Sirius XM DJ Jose Mangin was so impressed by OTHERWISE that he immediately added "Soldiers" into rotation on Sirius XM's Octane channel.
In a matter of weeks, the track reached the top of Octane's charts, the single sold more than 10,000 units independently, and Las Vegas' best-kept secret was making tremors at a national level. They signed with Century Media Records in December, began recording their debut album with acclaimed producer Jay Baumgardner [Godsmack, Bush, Papa Roach, Seether, Sevendust, P.O.D.] at his NRG Studios in January, and in February embarked on their first national tour as a band, opening for Pop Evil.
"Soldiers" is the first time America is hearing OTHERWISE, but it's not the first time they're hearing Adrian Patrick, who was the featured male vocalist on the In This Moment single "The Promise," from the band's 2010 album A Star-Crossed Wasteland. Patrick was asked to record a scratch vocal for the song, so producer Kevin Churko could shop the track to more established vocalists... However, the results were so good his vocals ended up making the final cut, and his duet with In This Moment frontwoman Maria Brink was promoted and performed on each date of 2010's Mayhem Tour. "Ryan and I followed Mayhem around in our Mom's decade-old minivan," says Adrian, who hit the road with his brother and put 17,000 miles on the vehicle, paying for gas by walking into the crowd and selling CDs on every date of the tour. "We had to send the van off to a junkyard right before Thanksgiving – I had a lump in my throat."
OTHERWISE aren't the first band to put their blood, sweat and tears into their music, but they are the only band who could have made True Love Never Dies – the 11-track debut is a testament to their perseverance in the face of adversity, and a living, breathing tribute to their cousin, who died shortly before they signed with Century Media. "Our cousin had those words tattooed on his neck, so now we're holding onto that idea, and the belief that true love never dies," explains Ryan of the album title.
On an album ripe with anthems, "Scream Now" and "Vegas Girl" are arena ready - the first a call to arms for everyone to scream out in unison (for loved ones, lost ones and life), while the latter is a testimonial of sorts – not pointed at any one girl in particular, but definitely targeting a particular "type" of girl. One of the album's more emotional moments is "1000 Pictures (I Don't Apologize)." "We wrote that song one night in Hollywood," says Ryan, "the chords came, the melodies came, heartbreak came right after... and the lyrics were written. It's an anthem for the heartbroken."
"When we look back at the songs and their subject matter, calling the album True Love Never Dies was very fitting," says Adrian. "We've worked really hard to get to this point, and this album is proof that hard work, perseverance, and a little bit of talent can take you a long way." Adds his brother Ryan, "we're at the foot of Everest now – we've been climbing the small desert hills in Vegas, now it's time for the mountain..."
Venue Information:
Chameleon Club
223 North Water Street
Lancaster, PA, 17603
http://www.chameleonclub.net/